Branch Shadows 1-8, 2021

These black and white drawings are seminal to becoming settled in my new studio.

The branch from the dead tree outside the back door of my new abode was going to be thrown away. The person who sold me my living and working space was aware of my work; he held it up one day and asked me if I wanted it; I said, yes. And I drew a picture of the branch. It was the beginning shape to my new vocabulary.

Four Panels, Mountain and Branches, 2021

These panels reflect my new environment. The mountain “lines” represent the Berkshires in MA. And the branches images come from a template I made of a drawing I did of a branch broken off a dead tree/bush once planted outside my door.

The incorporation of the drawings into the panel format demonstrates the influence of Japanese panel paintings from the turn of the 20th century.

Four Panels, Mountains and Branches 1-4, 2021, 60 inch high by total 91.75 inches width, colored pencil on black rag paper
Mountain and Branches 1, 2021
Mountain and Branches 2, 2021
Mountain and Branches 3, 2021
Mountain and Branches 4, 2021
Mountain and Branches, 2021, detail 2
Mountain and Branches, 2021, detail 1

Installation, 1981

This installation image showing velvet going horizontally and lanyard vertically occurred at Berkshire Community College in Pittsfield, MA, in a Faculty Show.

This is also the only time it has been created and was a combination of the materials I had been working with since I went to CalArts and later used in my exhibits at Claire S. Copley Gallery and San Jose State University in the mid-seventies.

The velvet is far more expressively handled because it is soft and pliable and represents, in essence, my femininity.

The dimensions of the BCC installation are seventy inches high by sixty-six inches width and probably six inches at its deepest point, where the velvet was bent out into space in a curve shape.

Pushpins hold the elements to the wall.

And it is based on the principles of the lanyard piece originally created in the corner of Gallery A-102 at CalArts, whereby the vertical length plus the molding equals my height in inches and the horizontal length is equals sixty-six inches, the width of my arm span.

Installation, lanyard and pushpins, each side 70″ h by 66″ w, 1970

Beginning Painting, 2007

There is never enough “beginning.” I was desperately seeking a means to dissolve the edges of the geometric templates at this time.

As with any language, the characters are difficult to re-work, re-make into new means of communicating.

Each part is sixteen inches square. The paintings are done with acrylic with some grease pencil enhancement.

Untitled, Long, 2006

I just discovered these drawings the other day when I was searching for something else. They are yet another statement rattling the template of the arc into grid formats.

They are each 50 inches high by 21 inches width. All mixed media.

#1
#2
#3
Black & White

Healing Quilt Series 1-9, 2006

This series of drawings is one of the best explanations of my process coming out of using arc templates to create shapes, characters, and language. I did these after I did the three large Healing Series paintings.

They are actually drawings for nine paintings. Each small square was intended to be 10 inches by 10 inches. The text on the left of the first one comes from The Communion of Spirts, a catalog on African-American quilters by Roland L. Freedman, 1996.

I love these drawings. They are a complete statement.

They are each 22 inches square, colored pencil, ink and acrylic on rag paper.

Two pastel paintings, 1982

In the 80’s, I did so many pastels, there was at least a half-inch of pastel dust on my first studio floor. I stopped doing them because the dust was going to affect my breathing and that of my family.

These pastels were quite large, up to 100 inches across. They were hanging on a wall in a storage of my house for almost 50 years. Now they are all rolled up in another place.

But many are in a portfolio. Some have been lost because they were not fixed properly and moved around so much that the pastel was smeared. The image directly below is one of the drawings that was smeared beyond recognition. It is called Abierto.

These two below have been framed since they were made so have been preserved.

It’s All for the Best, 50 inches by 38 inches, pastel on rag paper
Landscape a la Mode, 50 inches by 38 inches, pastel on rag paper

White Characters, 2013

These drawings are all small, five and half inches by four and a half inches. Pigmented pen on black rag paper.

The “character” designation manifests my concern with developing a language of sorts, even though no character means anything, only itself. This group of nine was not the only time I dealt with this stepping off point.

The language has to do with the actual drawing of the curve which is cursive in nature: trusting myself to begin and end at the same place when I made the single line that is the initial curve before cross-hatching over it.

50 Lines within a Square, 1973

These drawings adhered to the “concept” of doing them which is denoted by the titles. Seriously, the titles go on and on in a conceptual-art-descriptive format unfolding every detail of the idea that can be verbalized.

Top: “25 Attempts to Fill a Square with 50 non-ruled lines…”

Bottom: Top: “25 Attempts to Fill a Square with 50 ruled lines…”

These drawings were shown at the Claire S. Copley Gallery in 1974.

Single Loopy Lines 1-9, 2013

I never stop believing in the simplicity of these kind of lines.

Each is fourteen by eleven inches. Plain ol’ pen on rag paper.