Transformation from the Root, #1-5, 2020

 

These pieces are all on canvas. They each measure sixty inches in height by twenty-two inches in width.

They are made with acrylic, colored pencil and marker. The first layer is acrylic and forms the background. The second layer traces the shapes left by the dripping paint with permanent silver marking pen. The last layer uses a stencil made from a drawing I made of a tree a long time ago. The shapes left by tracing the stencil are colored in with colored pencil.

The title of the series comes from a statement made by Gene Youngblood in a talk on the internet celebrating the 50th anniversary of the release of his landmark book, Expanded Cinema. In the talk, he and the moderator were in an exchange regarding how the global society can change using technology as one of its means.

My affection for trees stems from a lifelong interest in how they create intimate spaces in which to linger and how the shadows of the branches are embracing and graceful and evanescent.

Trees are integral to the earth’s environment. The more that trees are brought into human consciousness, the more concern we have for them. Trees have their own forms of growth and communication. They demonstrate when they are hurt and when they are thriving. We cannot take them for granted.

Tree Kimono, 2019

The Tree Kimono is made in several parts. The total dimensions are 70 inches in width by 90 inches in height. The media are colored pencil and ink.

Lyn Horton, Tree Kimono, 2019, 90 in x 70 in, ink and colored pencil on rag paper (several parts)

Lyn Horton, detail left Tree Kimono, 2019, 90 in x 70 in, ink and colored pencil on rag paper (several parts)
Detail, left

Lyn Horton, detail center Tree Kimono, 2019, 90 in x 70 in, ink and colored pencil on rag paper (several parts)
Detail, upper center

Flying Series #1-11, 2002

All these pieces are diptychs, measuring 22″ in height by 44.5″ wide. They are mixed media: charcoal and watercolor crayon. (The thumbtacks are collaterally visible because the photos were taken by me and I didn’t know enough to do something other than that.)

Img#13 Flying Series #1 - 2002

flying Series#4,2002

Img#17 Flying Series #5 - 2002

Img#14 Flying Series #2 - 2002

flyingseries#8,2002Img#18 Flying Series #6 - 2002

Img#15 Flying Series #3 - 2002

flyingseries#9,2002

Img#19 Flying Series #7 - 2002

flyingseries#10,2002

flyingseries#11,2002

Unknowing Innocence 1-7, 2004

These are all pairs of Paintings, watercolor pencil and acrylic on canvas, 60″ high x total 24 inches wide.

Unknowing Innocence #1, 2004
#1

Unknowing Innocence #2, 2004
#2

Unknowing Innocence #3, 2004
#3

Unknowing Innocence #4, 2004
#4

Unknowing Innocence #5, 2004
#5

Unknowing Innocence #6, 2004
#6

Unknowing Innocence #7, 2004
#7

Untitled Series, 2007

These drawings are mixed media, pencil, colored pencil and ink, each 11 inches square.

11 x 11 blue ink & white col pencil, 07   11 x 11 green ink, 07

        11 x 11 orange ink, 07   11 x 11 pencil 2, 07

11 x 11 purple ink & white col pencil #2, 07

11 x 11 red ink & white col pencil, 07 11 x 11 slate gray & pencil, 07

11 x 11 yellow ink & pencil, 07

11x 11 ink & white col pencil, 07

Dividing The Gems, 2005-6

All of these drawings are 22.25 ” square, mixed media.

dividing the gems (blue) 05
Blue

dividing the gems (green) 06
Green

dividing the gems (orange) 06
Orange

dividing the gems (pen) 05
Pen 

dividing the gems (pencil) 05
Pencil

dividing the gems (purple) 06
Purple

dividing the gems (red) 05
Red

dividing the gems (yellow) 06
Yellow

Laos Installation, Details, 2014

These images show the installation of the piece, Naga #2, at the Embassy of Laos in Vientiane, going down the wall from left to right. The textiles are all Lao from different regions of the country. They were gathered at markets and from mills on my visits there.

Many of the small pieces of woven cloth are often incorporated into clothing as borders on skirts or jackets. Some of the large tapestries are used as hangings.  The horizontal center blue & Tai Daeng weave tapestry is an antique.

The black “line” is velvet cording, weaving in and out of the spaces between the tapestries. In some places, examples of the silk thread used in weaving the tapestries were stretched out to intertwine with the materials laid out on the wall. I used two thousand brass nails to mount the cording as well as the tapestries. At one point in the middle of the installation, I believed that I was going to run out of nails. So I decided to use the velvet in broad strokes taking it straight across the materials on the wall instead of curving it over or around the tapestries. To some, this falsely appeared as though I was holding up the tapestries when, in fact, it was a pragmatic decision to save the number of nails that I had left. The straight “lines” complement the angularity of the Lao designs; the textile version of the Naga is an example.  

The title, Naga, is the name of the mythical dragon-like creature that protects the country. It lives in the Mekong River. Laos is not the only country which reveres the Naga.

These pictures are the only ones that were taken of the piece. I took them when I finished installing it. I take great risk in publishing them here.

 

Naga detail 1

Naga detail 2

Naga detail 3

Naga detail 4

Naga detail 5

Naga detail 6

Naga detail 7

Naga detail 8

 

Naga detail 9
This shows a wedding collar posed in a V-shape. For me, this positioning signified the marriage of the two cultures, that of Laos and the United States, with me as the filter for the latter.

 

Naga detail 10

Naga detail 11

Drawing Installation, 1987

This drawing, entitled Parallel to Palladio, was installed in the office of the President of United Satellite Communications, Madison Avenue, New York, NY. The interior designer was Tom Mahoney, then working with GN Associates, New York.

Parallel to Palladio featured in interior design by Tom Mahoney, GN Associates, 1987

Steps One through Nine, 2016

Each drawing is 6 inches height x 18 inches width, ink and gouache on rag paper.

Lyn Horton, Step One, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Two, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Three, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Four, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Five, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Six, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Seven, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Eight, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Lyn Horton, Step Nine, 2016, 6 in h x 18 w, ink and gouache on rag paper

Two Black and White Things, 2011

Lyn Horton, copyright, Black & White Things, 2011, 30 inches x 44 inches, ink on gouache on black paper hires
 60 inches height x 80 inches width, acrylic marker on gouache on white rag paper 

Lyn Horton, copyright, Black & White Things, 2011, 60 inches x 44 inches, ink on gouache on black paper hires
60 inches height x 44 inches width, ink on gouache on black paper